Friday, January 26, 2018

A Surprising Secret About Sequence Learning in the Brain

This Is Not the Way It Works

Note: This article is not meant for atheists or materialists. It is for believers only. Sorry.

When thinking about how sequence learning might work in the brain, most people would imagine some sort of neuronal mechanism that strings activated nodes (minicolums) together, as one would string pearls to form a necklace. Well, this is not the way it works. Surprisingly, the brain has no special mechanism for sequence learning. The brain forms the pearls that will go in the necklace but does not string them together. Sequence learning occurs automatically. That is to say, the pearls know where they belong in their sequence. It gets even better. If the order of the sequence changes for whatever reason, the pearls will automatically rearrange their positions. How is that possible?

The Timer

The trick is to use a timer. I have always maintained that the brain is essentially a massive timing mechanism. The hippocampus can generate special spike trains that are sent out to the cortex and used for timing purposes. When a node is activated, the time of its activation is immediately recorded and the node is given an initial activation strength. This is what neurobiologists and psychologists refer to as a memory trace. Unless reawakened multiple times and strengthened, the trace dissipates and the memory is gone. What is interesting is that, during recollection, the brain can use the same spike trains internally to reactivate the nodes in the exact order in which they were activated.
Wake up, and strengthen the things that remain, which were about to die; for I have not found your deeds completed in the sight of My God. So remember what (how) you have received and heard; and keep it, and repent. Therefore if you do not wake up, I will come like a thief, and you will not know at what hour I will come to you.

Rev 3:2-3, Message to Sardis
Enjoy.

Friday, January 19, 2018

Re: The High Priest, the Golden Menorah and the Cortical Column

I apologise for taking down the previous article about the cortical column. I just don't think it is the right time for that knowledge to be released. Not yet. Sorry.

Friday, January 12, 2018

I Understand the Cortical Column

Just a quick post for the record. My original model of the cortical column was in error. The column does not represent a sequence of nodes, as I assumed back then, but a single node in a long sequence. Each minicolumn is a different manifestation of that one node. I was right about one thing: only one minicolumn can be activated at a time. The activation of a minicolumn is very deterministic and highly predictive: it has only one successor and one predecessor. That's all for now.

Have a good weekend.

Thursday, January 11, 2018

I Have a Dream

Yaskawa Electric’s industrial robot Motoman.
Photograph by Yoshikazu Rsuno — AFP/Getty Images

I Would Like to Build a Robot Cook

I need money to finance a robotics project. I would like to build an intelligent robot cook, one that is smart enough to walk into any equipped kitchen and fix a meal of scrambled eggs with bacon, toast and coffee, and clean up afterwards. Mainstream artificial intelligence practitioners enjoy bragging about their achievements using deep learning and other AI techniques. They want us to believe that they are making progress toward true intelligence by making machines that can beat a human expert at board games like chess or GO. Don't let them fool you. None of it has anything to do with artificial general intelligence (AGI). In spite of the hype, their brand of AI could not be used to perform the simplest tasks that humans have no trouble with. The robot cook I am talking about is hopelessly beyond their capabilities.

Raising the Money

I want to obtain the necessary funds for my project without raising suspicions from ill-intentioned parties. My current plan is to offer a device for hearing impaired individuals that would enhance foreground speech while muting all background noises, including other voices. Many hearing impaired people have trouble tuning out unwanted noises from a conversation. They don't so much have a hearing problem as a problem with their attention mechanism. This is not a problem that can be solved with ear plugs at this time. It requires significant computing resources which can only be provided by a more powerful device such as a smartphone.

Smartphone App

My plan is to market this product as a smartphone app. The worldwide hearing aids market is in the billions of dollars. Such an app could potentially help me raise all the funds I need for my robotics project. I refuse to accept any investment from third parties. Wish me luck.