Saturday, May 4, 2013

Excuses, Excuses

One of the reasons that I cannot wrap my head around artificial intelligence at this time is that I am currently heavily involved in trying to find a cure or an effective treatment for my wife who suffers from ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The good news is that I am now convinced that we are on the verge of a genuine breakthrough, not just for ALS but for other neurodegenerative diseases as well. The bad news is that AI will have to wait a little longer. One thing at a time. Hang in there.

7 comments:

Bill said...

Sorry to hear about your wife. Not sure if you already came across Neuralstem, but it might be worth looking into:

http://www.neuralstem.com/cell-therapy-for-als

Bill said...

There is also a clinical trial under way at Michigan:

http://www.med.umich.edu/pnrd/research/als.htm

Louis Savain said...

Bill, thank you for your comments. Yes, I'm aware of those trials but, unfortunately, it will take many years for those treatments to become available to patients. Most ALS sufferers have only a few years to live.

My research over the last several years has me convinced that ALS is caused by a disruption in the GABAergic system of the brain. As such, it is related to Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, I have identified a substance that I think will result in spectacular improvements. I'm trying to convince her doctors to conduct an experimental treatment based on my hypothesis. Will keep you posted.

Bill said...

Louis, I will keep you and your wife in my thoughts and prayers.

FYI there's a biotech company in the bay area with an interesting compound in Phase III trial:

http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/blog/biotech/2012/10/als-lou-gehrigs-disease-neuraltus-np001.html?page=all

Bill said...

Parkinson's has a very particular pathology where a very particular subset of neurons in the substantia nigra are lost. With ALS, it's the motor neurons that are lost.

Louis Savain said...

I think ALS and Parkinson's look like completely different diseases but, underneath, it all has to do with a dysfunction in the complex inhibitory neurotransmitter system of the brain. Apparently the brain uses a coded key/lock system to make sure that inhibitory signals reach the correct target neurons during fetal development. It's pretty ingenious. Unless the inhibitory receptors receive the right combination of GABA or Glycine neurotransmitters, the post-synaptic neurons will not be inhibited as they should. The system works only if the brain can manufacture all the neurotransmitters it needs. Sometimes, there is a malfunction in the manufacturing in parts of the brain. Depending on the location, this neurotransmitter deficiency manifests itself as neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's or ALS. Fortunately, we have hundreds of natural and synthetic substances (aka psychoactive drugs) that can give the brain a little push in the right direction. It gets a little more complicated than that because some of the same neurotransmitters are also used by the inflammatory system of the brain.

I can't say much more about it until I have completed this experiment I am trying to orchestrate with members of the medical profession. I'll keep you updated.

sarah lee said...

Most people don't have that willingness to break bad habits. They have a lot of excuses and they talk like victims. See the link below for more info.

#excuses
www.matreyastudios.com