Thursday, August 26, 2010

Lattice Interactions, Part III

Part I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX

Abstract

In Part II, I wrote about Ezekiel's vision of strange symbolic creatures called cherubim. I wrote that cherubim represent normal matter particles and I gave a rundown of the various symbols and metaphors associated with seraphim and cherubim. In this post, I examine the electron in the light of my current interpretation of the ancient symbols. I also argue that there might be three types of electrons and that a positron is really an electron with a flipped orientation.

Why I Think that There Might Be Three Types of Electrons

Physicists tell us that the electron is a point particle and that it has several properties such as mass, charge and spin angular momentum. Spin is responsible for the electron's magnetic properties. We are told that the electron is a spin 1/2 particle meaning that its has two spin states or directions, +z and -z. Let us ignore the angular momentum nonsense (particles do not really spin) for now and suppose that the electron's spin is just a discrete property corresponding to its absolute, discrete direction. My hypothesis is that the scriptural symbol used for a particle's direction is the face and that a face can have one of two orientations, forward or backward. This would suggest that an electron has only one face and two possible orientations. However, I have good reasons to suppose that an electron has at least two faces, one for magnetic interactions and one for electric interactions (see paragraph below). Let's call them the magnetic face and the electric face for now.
As I wrote elsewhere, one of the four seraphim that comprise the lattice is associated with the electric charge while the other three are responsible for magnetic phenomena. The problem is that, if the electron only has one magnetic face, it can interact with only one of the magnetic seraphim in the lattice. This may not really be a problem but somehow I find it hard to believe that one half of the lattice is unused. I would seem that there should be three types of electrons. I'll get back to this important topic in an upcoming post.

The Real Difference Between Electrons and Positrons

As I mentioned above, an electron apparently has two faces, a magnetic face and an electric face, each of which has two possible orientations. What this means is that a positron is just an electron whose electric face is oriented in the opposite direction. In Part IV, I'll explore the finer details of electron/lattice interactions and electric fields in the light of the properties I have described so far.

2 comments:

Bill said...

The problem is that, if the electron only has one magnetic face, it can interact with only one of the magnetic seraphim in the lattice. This may not really be a problem but somehow I find it hard to believe that one half of the lattice is unused.

I don't understand this. Can you explain a little more?

Louis Savain said...

Bill: I don't understand this. Can you explain a little more?

Well, in order for an electron to interact with a lattice particle (seraph), the two must have similar faces. If every electron has only two faces, it can only interact with two types of seraphim. If this is true, it would follow that electrons cannot interact with half of the seraphim in the lattice. I find this hard to accept.

At this time, I think there are two alternatives. Either there are three types of electrons with only two faces each, or every electron has four faces. I had time to think about it some more after I wrote Part III and I am now leaning toward the second alternative: an electron has four faces. I'll have more on this in my next installment.