Sunday, August 24, 2014

Alternative Anti-Inflammatory Remedies for ALS

Alternatives

I was thinking about the dramatic effect that dexamethasone had on my wife's ALS symptoms on several occasions and it occurred to me that there must be several non-prescription drugs and supplements that could help tame the neuro-inflammation of ALS. After a quick search, I came up with the following: Pomegranate juice, ginger root or extract, Lunasin (soy peptides), zinc gluconate, turmeric, vitamin D3 and last, but not least, Naproxen (Aleve). Most of these products are easily obtainable in most countries. Soy peptides can be ordered online.

Naproxen

Naproxen is particularly interesting because it inhibits the prostaglandin E2 hormones and pro-inflammatory cytokines that are known to be elevated in ALS patients. I would be interested in knowing about the experiences of ALS patients out there who might have experimented with a high dose (2000 mg or more per day) of Naproxen for a few days. I suspect it might have a noticeably positive effect on some patients. To anyone who may want to experiment with Naproxen, I would also recommend taking some L-arginine and magnesium during the treatment to help dilate the arteries and capillaries. This should make it easier for the drug to reach difficult areas of the brain and spinal cord. Of course, if you do get improvements from a high dose of naproxen, it goes without saying that something more powerful like dexamethasone could do wonders. I'm a little excited about the potential of Naproxen because it is an easily obtainable drug. If it did cause improvements in ALS symptoms, it would send a powerful message because a lot of people can try it at home without a prescription.

See Also:

Anesthetics and Glucocorticoids for ALS
Naproxen Reduces Excitotoxic Neurodegeneration in Vivo

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

The Evil Lie about ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease) and Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

There is no Question that ALS is an Autoimmune Disease

Those who claim otherwise are either working for Big Pharma or the ALS vulture industry, lying for some personal reason or do not know what they are talking about. ALS is caused by any of several types of genetic mutations. But what characterizes most forms of ALS is that the G-protein coupled receptors are defective. These ubiquitous receptors are used directly by both the nervous system and the immune system. They include GABA, glycine, serotonin, glutamate and several others. Again, these receptors are used directly by both systems. It has been shown experimentally that inflammation is elevated in the brainstem and spinal cord of ALS patients long before the appearance of symptoms. This stuff has been known for decades. So Big Pharma or the ALS vulture industry are lying through their teeth when they continue to insist that inflammation is a secondary consequence of the disease and not part of the genesis of the pathology. They should know better. Shame on them.

The Evil Lie that Killed My Wife and Countless Others

My wife died because ALS experts lied to me. When I began investigating ALS, I was assured early on that ALS was not an autoimmune disease and that it had already been proven over and over that anti-inflammatory drugs have absolutely no effect on the disease. My mistake was to believe this evil lie. So I ignored the fact that my wife's improvements always occurred soon after being administered an anti-inflammatory drug like dexamethasone. I dismissed dexamethasone and instead focused on the only other drug that could have had an effect on the disease, the anesthetics. Anesthetics are powerful anti-inflammatory drugs in their own right and should be included in any comprehensive treatment because they target certain important receptors that traditional anti-inflammatory drugs don't. But anesthetics are not enough. The biggest contributors to my wife's improvements were the glucocorticoid drugs. But I was a fool and my wife died as a result. If I had not believed in the lie, I would have saved her life. I failed miserably.
Important: There are several ALS variants caused by different mutations. Not every ALS patient will see improvements from dexamethasone or prednisone or any one drug. But I believe that many will. Those who don't see any improvements should not despair. The immune system is vast and complex. It is likely that their particular form of ALS affects a different part of the immune system. Other types of anti-inflammatory drugs or a complex cocktail of drugs may do the trick.

Another reason that some PALS may not respond successfully to anti-inflammatory drugs has to do with drug penetration. Inflammation and other factors may prevent the drugs from reaching areas of the CNS where there are needed the most. Such patients may require direct injections into their brainstem and/or spine.
A Crime against Humanity

To claim that ALS is not an autoimmune disease and therefore cannot be treated with anti-inflammatory drugs is a crime against humanity because it blinds an entire community of terminal patients, their loved ones and their doctors to the availability of cheap, off-the-shelf drugs. These can have a powerful therapeutic effect on ALS, especially during the early stages of the disease before the motor neurons begin to suffer irreversible damage. This truth about the ability of anti-inflammatory drugs to effectively treat ALS is exactly what the ALS vulture industry and Big Pharma do not want you know. They are an evil society controlled by assholes and psychopaths who are only in it for the money. They don't give two shits about the lives and sufferings of millions of people. They are inhuman, traitors to their own species, who love to line their pockets with billions of dollars of the public's money. The Nazis and the Holocaust come to mind. When the dust settles on this despicable crime, there will be hell to pay.

I Hold You Responsible for my Wife's Death

I hold Big Pharma and the ALS vulture industry responsible for my wife's slow agonizing death and that of countless other PALS. I am not afraid of you and I'm coming after you with all the legal, scientific and political power I can muster.

See Also:

Treat ALS with Anti-Inflammatory Drugs
Anesthetics and Glucocorticoids for ALS

Monday, August 11, 2014

Treat ALS with Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

This is the dirty little secret that Big Pharma and the corrupt ALS therapy development industry do not want you to know. Most ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or Lou Gehrig's disease) patients can be treated with cheap, off the shelf, non-proprietary anti-inflammatory drugs. Here is a partial list of ALS patients who have seen major improvements and reversal of symptoms after being given anti-inflammatory drugs:
  1. Ted harada. Drugs: anesthetics, basiliximab, methylprednisolone, prednisone, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil.
  2. Ernie Schmid. Drugs: various glucocorticoids.
  3. Paul Aiken. Drugs: local anesthetics, Kenalog, dexamethasone.
  4. Louis Savain's wife. Drugs: anesthetics, dexamethasone.
There are more, I am sure. Some patients are reporting improvements from anti-inflammatory supplements such as Lunasin (a peptide) and zinc gluconate. Other people have reported sudden improvements in speech and swallowing ability after a trip to the dentist where they are injected with dexamethasone and lidocaine. Please, feel free to add more items to the list if you know of other examples.
Important: There are several ALS variants caused by different mutations. Not every ALS patient will see improvements from dexamethasone or prednisone or any one drug. But I believe that many will. Those who don't see any improvements should not despair. The immune system is vast and complex. It is likely that their particular form of ALS affects a different part of the immune system. Other types of anti-inflammatory drugs or a complex cocktail of drugs may do the trick.

Another reason that some PALS may not respond successfully to anti-inflammatory drugs has to do with drug penetration. Inflammation and other factors may prevent the drugs from reaching areas of the CNS where there are needed the most. Such patients may require direct injections into their brainstem and/or spine.
See Also:

Anesthetics and Glucocorticoids for ALS

Anesthetics and Glucocorticoids for ALS

Note: I am reposting this article because I am trying to send a message that is dear to my heart. I do it in my wife's memory.

In 2007, my wife, who died of ALS last year, experienced a full recovery of her left foot paralysis immediately after spine surgery. Although she did not know it at the time, the paralysis was caused by ALS. Unfortunately, the symptoms returned within a month and it was downhill thereafter. After requesting her medical records, I learned that during the operation, she was anesthetized with inhalational anesthetics and she was given 2 grams of the antibiotic drug Cefazolin (Ancef) and 10 mg of Decadron (Dexamethasone), a very powerful glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory drug.

Excerpt
Somewhere around 2010, I became convinced that it was the anesthetics (propofol, sevoflurane, etc.) that had caused my wife's remission. The reason is that she also experienced a strong remission of her ALS symptoms immediately after other surgical procedures during which she was anesthetized. But the main reason that I dismissed dexamethasone is that I was assured by ALS experts that anti-inflammatory drugs have been tried many times before and were shown to be completely ineffective against ALS. This turned out to be a lie, the big lie about ALS that Big Pharma has preached for many years. I now understand that it was a combination of the anesthetics and the glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory drug, routinely given during such procedures, that had caused her improvements. Both have anti-inflammatory properties. I did some research and found out that they work synergistically by enhancing and complementing each other's therapeutic properties.

I hold Big Pharma, the Department of Health and Human Services and the ALS therapy development industry responsible for my wife's death and that of countless others who perished from this horrible disease.

ALS Is an Autoimmune Disease

Even though many in the ALS money making industry maintain otherwise, there is no question that ALS is an autoimmune disease. This is why my wife and other ALS sufferers have experienced strong improvements after injection with anti-inflammatory drugs. This is not the first time that glucocorticoid drugs have been implicated in spectacular ALS remissions. In 2011, famous ALS patient Ted Harada experienced an amazing recovery after being anesthetized for up to five hours during stem cell treatment and given several anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids to prevent rejection. In June 2013, Ernie Schmid published an ALS remission story in which he explained how he kept his ALS under control with powerful glucocorticoids. There is also the story of US Authors Guild's director Paul Aiken whose ALS went into remission after injections with the glucocorticoid drug Kenalog. Other ALS sufferers have reported strong improvements in their speech and ability to swallow after a visit to the dentist. It turns out that most dentists inject their patients with a mixture of dexamethasone (to prevent swelling) and a local anesthetic during tooth extractions or root canals.
Important: There are several ALS variants caused by different mutations. Not every ALS patient will see improvements from dexamethasone or prednisone or any one drug. But I believe that many will. Those who don't see any improvements should not despair. The immune system is vast and complex. It is likely that their particular form of ALS affects a different part of the immune system. Other types of anti-inflammatory drugs or a complex cocktail of drugs may do the trick.

Another reason that some PALS may not respond successfully to anti-inflammatory drugs has to do with drug penetration. Inflammation and other factors may prevent the drugs from reaching areas of the CNS where there are needed the most. Such patients may require direct injections into their brainstem and/or spine.
I would hate to see so many ALS sufferers needlessly die from this awful disease while a cheap and effective treatment might be available off the shelf. Unfortunately, we have a broken and heartless health system that refuses to listen to the opinions of their terminal patients and forbids them to experiment with various drugs, even under doctor's supervision. We sorely need a 'right to try' law for terminal patients.

PS. If you have ALS or you care for someone who does, please do what you can to get your hands on some dexamethasone and conduct your own experiments at home. It's a relatively benign drug. Just make sure you don't have any infection before you begin to experiment with it.

Discussions

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Anesthetics and Glucocorticoids for ALS

Note: I just received a note from Sharon Halton, a research coordinator at the Houston Methodist Neurological Institute saying "Our office has been conducting a study of dexamethasone for more than a year and we look forward to evaluating the results when the last of our subjects have completed their treatment." Let us hope it is a success. Regardless of the outcome, I maintain that the efficacy of dexamethasone is enhanced by anesthetics and vice versa. This synergistic interaction is why future treatments/experiments should consider using both concurrently. (7/25/14)

In 2007, my wife, who died of ALS last year, experienced a full recovery of her left foot paralysis immediately after spine surgery. Although she did not know it at the time, the paralysis was caused by ALS. Unfortunately, the symptoms returned within a month and it was downhill thereafter. After requesting her medical records, I learned that during the operation, she was anesthetized with inhalational anesthetics and she was given 2 grams of the antibiotic drug Cefazolin (Ancef) and 10 mg of Decadron (Dexamethasone), a very powerful glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory drug.

Excerpt
Somewhere around 2010, I became convinced that it was the anesthetics (propofol, sevoflurane, etc.) that had caused my wife's remission. The reason is that she also experienced a strong remission of her ALS symptoms immediately after other surgical procedures during which she was anesthetized. But the main reason that I dismissed dexamethasone is that I was assured by ALS experts that anti-inflammatory drugs have been tried many times before and were shown to be completely ineffective against ALS. This turned out to be a lie, the big lie about ALS that Big Pharma has preached for many years. I now understand that it was a combination of the anesthetics and the glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory drug, routinely given during such procedures, that had caused her improvements. Both have anti-inflammatory properties. I did some research and found out that they work synergistically by enhancing and complementing each other's therapeutic properties.

I hold Big Pharma, the Department of Health and Human Services and the ALS therapy development industry responsible for my wife's death and that of countless others who perished from this horrible disease.

ALS Is an Autoimmune Disease

Even though many in the ALS money making industry maintain otherwise, there is no question that ALS is an autoimmune disease. This is why my wife and other ALS sufferers have experienced strong improvements after injection with anti-inflammatory drugs. This is not the first time that glucocorticoid drugs have been implicated in spectacular ALS remissions. In 2011, famous ALS patient Ted Harada experienced an amazing recovery after being anesthetized for up to five hours during stem cell treatment and given several anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids to prevent rejection. In June 2013, Ernie Schmid published an ALS remission story in which he explained how he kept his ALS under control with powerful glucocorticoids. There is also the story of US Authors Guild's director Paul Aiken whose ALS went into remission after injections with the glucocorticoid drug Kenalog. Other ALS sufferers have reported strong improvements in their speech and ability to swallow after a visit to the dentist. It turns out that most dentists inject their patients with a mixture of dexamethasone (to prevent swelling) and a local anesthetic during tooth extractions or root canals.

I would hate to see so many ALS sufferers needlessly die from this awful disease while a cheap and effective treatment might be available off the shelf. Unfortunately, we have a broken and heartless health system that refuses to listen to the opinions of their terminal patients and forbids them to experiment with various drugs, even under doctor's supervision. We sorely need a 'right to try' law for terminal patients.

PS. If you have ALS or you care for someone who does, please do what you can to get your hands on some dexamethasone and conduct your own experiments at home. It's a relatively benign drug. Just make sure you don't have any infection before you begin to experiment with it.

Discussions

Friday, June 20, 2014

I Am Paranoid About the Future

A Potential Death Sentence for Humanity

The more I think about the consequences of artificial intelligence, the more I tremble with fear and apprehension. No, I'm not worried about some mythological sci-fi scenario in which robots rebel against their owners and wipe out humanity. That's just nonsense coming from the Singularity movement. Those who hold those views are clueless as to the true nature of intelligence. They are lost in a lost world.

I am paranoid because I understand the power of intelligence, artificial or otherwise. Any government, organization or individual who manages to control artificial intelligence will have the power to turn our beautiful planet into hell. The introduction of true AI into this world, as it currently is, with all its wars, corruption, crime and countless other horrors, would be a death sentence for humanity. I have seen the enemy and he is not a machine. He is us.

Hang in there.

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

The Rebel Speech Recognition Project

Progress Update

I am making rapid progress working on the Rebel Speech project and it will not be long before I release a demo. Please have patience. Rebel Speech will be a game changer in more ways than one. There are many things I need to consider as far as when and how to publish the results of my research. I cannot divulge the state of the engine at this time but what I can say is that it will take many by surprise.

My plan, which is subject to change, is to release a program that will demonstrate most of the capabilities of the model. The demo will consist of an executable program and a single data file for the neural network, aka the brain. The latter will be pre-trained to recognize the digits 1 to 20 (or more) in three or four different languages. I will not release the learning module and the source code, at least not for a while. The reason is that I need to monetize this technology to raise enough money to continue my AI research. What follows is a general description of Rebel Speech.

The Rebel Speech Recognition Engine

The Rebel Speech recognition engine is a biologically plausible spiking neural network designed for general audio learning and recognition. The engine uses two hierarchical subnetworks (one for patterns and one for sequences) to convert audio waveform data into discrete classifications that represent phonemes, syllables, words and even whole phrases and sentences. The following is a list of some of the characteristics that distinguish Rebel Speech’s architecture from other speech recognizers and neural networks:
  • It can learn to recognize speech in any language, just by listening from a microphone.
  • It can learn multiple languages concurrently.
  • It can learn to recognize any type of sound, e.g., music, machinery, animal sounds, etc.
  • Learning is fully unsupervised.
  • It is as accurate as humans on trained data. Or better.
  • It is noise and speaker tolerant.
  • It can recognize partial words and sentences.
  • It uses no math other than simple arithmetic.
Even though Rebel Speech has multiple layers of neurons in two hierarchical networks, this is where the similarity with deep learning ends. Unlike deep neural networks, the layers in Rebel Speech are not pre-wired and synaptic connections have no weights. A synapse is either connected or it is not. In fact, when Rebel Speech begins training, both networks are empty. Neurons and synapses are created and added on the fly during learning and only when needed.

Program Design

The engine consists of three software modules as depicted below.


The sensory layer is a collection of audio sensors. It uses a Fast Fourier Transform algorithm and threshold detectors (sensors) to convert audio waveform data into multiple streams of discrete signals (pulses) representing changes in amplitude. These raw signals are fed directly to pattern memory where they are combined into concurrent groups called patterns. Pattern detectors send their signals to sequence memory where they are organized into temporal hierarchies called branches. Each branch is a classification structure that represents a specific sound or sequence of sounds.

Winner-Takes-All

Most speech recognition systems use a Bayesian probabilistic model, such as the hidden Markov model, to determine which phoneme or word is most likely to come next in a given speech segment. A special algorithm is used to compile a large database of such probabilities. During recognition, hypotheses generated for a given sound segment are tested against these precompiled expectations and the one with the highest probability is selected.

In Rebel Speech, by contrast, the probability that the interpretation of a sound is correct is not known in advance. During learning, the engine creates a hierarchical database of as many non-random sequences of patterns as possible. Sequences compete for activation. When certain sound segments are detected, they attempt to activate various pre-learned sequences in memory and the one with the highest hit count is the winner. A winner usually pops up before the speaker has finished speaking. Once a winner is found, all other competing sequences are suppressed. This approach leads to high recognition accuracy even in noisy environments or when parts of the speech are missing.

Stay tuned.